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Snowflakes macro photography by Alexey Kljatov

Snowflakes Macro Photography By Alexey Kljatov

Snowflakes are conglomerations of frozen ice crystals which fall through the Earth's atmosphere. They begin as two snow crystals which develop when microscopic supercooled cloud droplets freeze. Snowflakes come in a variety of sizes and shapes. Complex shapes emerge as the flake moves through differing temperature and humidity regimes. Individual snowflakes are nearly unique in structure. Types which fall in the form of a ball due to melting and refreezing, rather than a flake, are known as graupel, with ice pellets and snow grains as examples of graupel.
Formation
Snow crystals form when tiny supercooled cloud droplets (about 10 μm in diameter) freeze. These droplets are able to remain liquid at temperatures lower than −18 °C (0 °F), because to freeze, a few molecules in the droplet need to get together by chance to form an arrangement similar to that in an ice lattice; then the droplet freezes around this "nucleus." Experiments show that this "homogeneous" nucleation of cloud droplets only occurs at temperatures lower than −35 °C (−31 °F). In warmer clouds an aerosol particle or "ice nucleus" must be present in (or in contact with) the droplet to act as a nucleus. The particles that make ice nuclei are very rare compared to nuclei upon which liquid cloud droplets form, however it is not understood what makes them efficient. Clays, desert dust and biological particles may be effective, although to what extent is unclear. Artificial nuclei include particles of silver iodide and dry ice, and these are used to stimulate precipitation in cloud seeding.

File information
Filename:594427.jpg
Album name:Art & Creativity
Rating (1 votes):55555
Keywords:#snowflakes #macro #photography #alexey #kljatov
Filesize:41 KiB
Date added:Nov 15, 2013
Dimensions:700 x 525 pixels
Displayed:113 times
URL:displayimage.php?pid=594427
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